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PSYCHOLOGICAL CAUSES OF CHILD DISEASES

Each childhood illness has its own psychological causes, eliminating which you can completely cure the child. Psychologists and psychotherapists have already discovered some correspondences of the psychological problems of the child and related childhood diseases.

So, a cough may symbolize the release of suppressed, unspoken aggression, anger, or irritation. If the child is not allowed to express their negative emotions, he unknowingly accumulates them and becomes ill.
And the cause of the common cold can be internal crying, feelings of helplessness, insecurity in the child.
The cause of stomach problems may be a situation or information that a child cannot “digest”, survive.
Eye problems arise when a child cannot see something in his life, in his family, unconsciously “closes his eyes to something.”
And ears can hurt in situations of constant scandals, quarrels, screams, insults. The child is sick because he does not want and cannot hear these cries and insults, although, of course, he is not aware of this.
Sleep disturbances in a child are the consequences of fear, anxiety, anxiety, tension, emotional overload.
But with the help of excess weight, the child can unknowingly defend itself, creating a protective layer around him.

Of course, these correspondences of psychological causes and childhood diseases are relative, in each case it is necessary to understand the psychologist in detail.
Medicines act on the symptoms of the disease, but do not eliminate its psychological causes. That is why, even with proper medical care, the child is sick and cannot be completely cured. And even a recovered child can fall ill again.
Of course, working with a psychologist does not cancel medical care, but makes it more effective. When the causes of childhood illness are eliminated, the symptoms can go away on their own.

Children’s diseases can be associated with changes in a child’s life: with the stage of weaning, potty training, with the start of visiting a kindergarten, school, with the birth of a brother or sister, with the divorce of parents, pre-divorce and post-divorce situations, with the death of someone from loved ones.

Let me give an example of a situation that is familiar to many parents. Beginning visiting a kindergarten is a huge stress for a child, which he can experience from two weeks to several months, and this largely depends on how much the parents prepared the child for kindergarten.

Katya’s mother had to urgently go to work, and so the girl was sent to kindergarten immediately for the whole day. But Katya literally immediately became very ill, and at home her mother was replaced by her grandmother. The next attempt to take the child to the garden also failed. Katya sobbed, refused to eat and go to the toilet in the garden. And the next day she fell ill again.
As a result, she did not go to kindergarten for more than two days in a row: two days in kindergarten, two or three weeks at home. The illness came to her aid and made it possible to stay at home with her beloved grandmother in a safe, comfortable environment. Indeed, purely psychologically very often children are better off being sick, but staying home than being healthy in kindergarten.
Katya’s mom came to our psychologist Dmitry Seinov for a set-up, and with the help of a set-up, they managed to cope with this situation.

A similar problem was with little Vadik, who was suffering from an allergic cough. The disease arose as a reaction to kindergarten, and especially to a particular teacher, with whom he did not feel safe. The teacher immediately disliked Vadik, constantly shouting at him, and set other children and their parents against him.
Vadik was transferred to another kindergarten, the atmosphere was better there, but he still had allergies, and Vadik went to the kindergarten three days a month. As a result, Vadik’s mother came to our center for placement, after which the allergic cough stopped.

Often in our speech we reflect our rejection of a certain situation or person, saying, “I have an allergy to this.” When a child does not accept the need to go to kindergarten, or does not accept a caregiver, then an allergy often comes to the rescue – an “allergy to kindergarten”.

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